foss.in/2012

Bangalore , 29th November to 1st December 2012

When

29th November to 1st December 2012 10:00 am - 08:30 pm

Website: foss.in/2012

Where

NIMHANS Convention Center
Marigowda Road
Near Dairy Circle
Bangalore, India
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29th November 2012

Time Hall 1 [500] Hall 2 [220] Hall 3 [140] Tutorial Area 1 Tutorial Area 2
10:00 am FOSS.IN Opening Ceremony 2012

FOSS.IN Opening Ceremony 2012

Speaker: Team foss.in
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 10:00 am
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Special Event
Type: Special

10:15 am
10:30 am          
10:45 am Big Data From Scratch.

Big Data From Scratch.

Speaker: Gopal V
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 10:45 am
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: High Performance
Type: Workout

Building Web Apps with Node.js

Building Web Apps with Node.js

Speaker: Shiju Varghese
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 10:45 am
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Web Development
Type: Talk

Node.js is a platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications. Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
The primary objective of the session is to give an introduction on Node.js and will demonstrates how to build apps using Node.js with Express.js and MongoDB.
This session would allows the developers to build highly scalable apps using Node.js.
Hacking Android bootloaders

Hacking Android bootloaders

Speaker: Sachin Patil
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 10:45 am
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Mobile Development
Type: Talk

Now most of Android Smart phone have atleast one OS to boot, but mosts geeks are not satisfied with it, they want an alternate or multiple OS to boot in. What if the bootloader or a first MTD partition can boot in the OS of choice ? it can be Android or a full fledge GNU/linux distro. Isn't this cool ? One can use the Phone as a full fledge system with their own Desktop Environment or Android versions running. This presentation will open the door to various boot options an embed system as to offer. People can extend there phone's limits to greater limits.
   
11:00 am    
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11:45 am Wikidata: the foundation to build your apps on

Wikidata: the foundation to build your apps on

Speaker: Lydia Pintscher
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 11:45 am
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Development Tools and Languages
Type: Talk

Wikipedia has changed the lives of many people by providing them access to the knowledge of the world. However Wikimedia, the movement behind Wikipedia and its sister-projects, has still not reached its goal of providing this knowledge to everyone for free. One large obstacle is the fact that smaller Wikipedias do not have the manpower to maintain an article base as large as the bigger Wikipedias can.
This problem is now being tackled with Wikidata (http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikidata), a new Wikimedia project. It will build a large common free and open data repository for the Wikipedias and the world. This will allow the small Wikipedias to benefit from the research work that the large Wikipedias are doing. At the same time this will build a repository of facts about the world we live in - from the date of birth of a famous person to the length of a river to the number of inhabitants of a city. Wikidata is currently being built as part of a 1-year project at Wikimedia Germany with funding from Google, [ai]ᅡᄇ and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. By December it will be possible to start building applications using the data in Wikidata. A lot is possible. Let¬タルs take a look at the what and how!

I want to give people the necessary knowledge to be able to use the data that the Wikipedia community will provide in Wikidata soon. Wikidata is a game-changer for Wikipedia and the audience of foss.in can be a part of it.
Polyglot Persistence Spring Applications on Red Hat OpenShift

Polyglot Persistence Spring Applications on Red Hat OpenShift

Speaker: Shekhar Gulati
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 11:45 am
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Cloud Computing
Type: Tutorial

Red Hat OpenShift is a multi-language, multi-framework, multi-cartridge Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) solution from Red Hat. This rich platform gives the developer several choices in terms of languages (e.g., Java, PHP, Python, Ruby, etc.), frameworks (e.g., Spring, JavaEE, etc.), and datastores (e.g., MySQL, PostgreSQL, and MongoDB). Support for multiple datastores enables you to choose the right tool for right problem and embraces Polyglot persistence. In this session, Xebia's Shekhar Gulati will cover:

1) What is OpenShift
2) How you can interact with the OpenShift rhc command line tool to:
Create an application
Enable Jenkins support
Add MongoDB and MySQL cartridges
3) Walk through a Spring MongoDB MySQL web application
4) Push the code to cloud
Bring your laptops and follow the steps as we create and push applications to the cloud.
Tips to optimize Android applications for memory

Tips to optimize Android applications for memory

Speaker: Satyam Kandula
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 11:45 am
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Mobile Development
Type: Talk

Android applications are constrained for memory. Though the Dalvik VM garbage collects the unreferenced memory, it is very easy to make mistakes of having the references go.

This talk will discuss some simple code snippets where one likely can make mistakes, will discuss some tips to optimize memory and will also discuss some tools that can help understand and optimize the applications for memory.

Though the focus may be for Android applications, this will be useful for java developers.
Promoting FOSS through Spoken Tutorials and Aakash

Promoting FOSS through Spoken Tutorials and Aakash

Speaker: Prof Moudgalya
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 11:45 am
Hall: Tutorial Area 1
Track: Tutorial
Type: Tutorial

 
12:00 pm  
12:15 pm  
12:30 pm  
12:45 pm          
1:00 pm Lunch
1:15 pm
1:30 pm
1:45 pm
2:00 pm Pushing Big Changes

Pushing Big Changes

Speaker: Lennart Poettering
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Open Standards
Type: Talk

In this talk I'd like to put some focus on pushing big changes in the Linux community. With out work on systemd we have made major changes to the what is generally considered a Linux OS. This necessarily triggered major political opposition all across the community. In this talk I would like to give an idea how we prepared, how we coped with that, how we succeeded and where we failed with all the politics around all this.
Writing a Sensor Driver for the Wii Remote Accelerometer for Windows

Writing a Sensor Driver for the Wii Remote Accelerometer for Windows

Speaker: Rajasekharan Vengalil
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Robotics
Type: Talk

This talk is a brief walk-through of a "hack" I did trying to make the accelerometer built into the Wii Remote work with the Sensor & Location Platform on Windows. The talk, apart from demonstrating the use of the accelerometer as a form of input for apps on Windows, will also show what it takes to integrate a piece of hardware such as the Wii Remote with the user mode device driver interface that Windows supports for sensor devices. The source and a write up I did about the hack is available here: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/56630/Writing-a-Sensor-Driver-for-the-Wiimote-on-Windows.
Continuous Integration for an open source Distro Eco system

Continuous Integration for an open source Distro Eco system

Speaker: Sriram Narayanan
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Operating Systems
Type: Talk

Open Source distros today build packages using a continuous build system. However, there is no upstream/downstream package building, and even elementary testing is left to testers.

For the Belenix project, we are using a continuous integration model to build packages, and indeed, the entire distro.

In this talk, we cover how our lessons can be taken an applied to other distros, in-house custom distro projects, and JeOS projects. The talk will also cover how we could arrive at an eco-system of continuous integration and testing of open source packages, where people all over the world collaborate to make better software and identify integration issues earlier.

Finally, we'll also showcase how easy we've made it for developers to contribute and track their work's status (upstream and downstream).
C++ tutorial/workshop.

C++ tutorial/workshop.

Speaker: Ulrich Drepper
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Tutorial Area 1
Track: Development Tools and Languages
Type: Tutorial

 
2:15 pm  
2:30 pm  
2:45 pm  
3:00 pm How to use Puppet like an Adult

How to use Puppet like an Adult

Speaker: Ben Kero & Daniel Maher
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 3:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Sys Admin
Type: Talk

Puppet is an immensely powerful tool for system administration, but with great power comes great responsibility, and it¬タルs not always obvious how to structure your configurations. There are many different ways to accomplish similar goals, and this malleability has given rise to a plethora of different design and architecture principles - some of which are good, and many of which are bad.

In this talk, Ben and Dan will explain the guiding principles of responsible Puppet design and architecture, walking you through real-world examples in order to illustrate solid methodological approaches, and illuminate Puppet administrators of all skill levels. As an added bonus, we will also show you how Puppet can be integrated into automated deployment and continuous integration platforms - an increasingly important component of today¬タルs development and operational landscape.

This talk will include such topics as:

- The separation of data and logic: How not to commit such Puppet sins as hardcoding credentials, paths, and other sensitive variables into your modules.
- External data sources: There are a variety of ways to interface Puppet with other data sources, including Heira, puppet-db, extlookup, dilly, and more.
- The tiered manifest approach: Leveraging different granularity levels for fine-grained control.
- Module-writing best practices: Why it¬タルs important for modules to be as generic as possible, and how to deal with differing environments and edge cases.
- Explicit sanity preservation: Verifying the validity of the incoming values.
- The importance of useful log output: Puppet has mature logging facilities built-in. Use them to get useful output in your dashboard, in email digests, and running manually triggered Puppet runs.
- Recommended (and enforced) style guides: Machine-readable manifests are good, but human-readable manifests are better.
- A comparison of visualisation tools: Everybody loves charts and graphs. Dashboards, reports aggregators, and automated metrics - oh my!
Autotest Hackspace

Autotest Hackspace

Speaker: Poornima Nayak
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 3:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Testing
Type: Talk

Autotest is a framework for fully automated testing. It is designed primarily to test the Linux kernel, though it is useful for many other functions such as to measure performance of subsystems. It's an open-source project under the GPL and is used and developed by a number of organizations, including Google, IBM, Red Hat, and many others.
This has been one of most active open source test tools as many patches are pouring and maintainers are also doing a very good job of keeping all the possible communication channels of Autotest active. Autotest is widely used by almost every organization or individual investing effort on Linux Kernel Testing. Refer to https://github.com/autotest/autotest/wiki for more information about Autotest.
Linux, being the poster child of open source development involves very complex pieces of heterogenous modules with hundreds of thousands of lines of code developed by hundreds of developers across the globe. Pace of development of Linux features is much ahead than the pace at which the Linux OS is being tested. Testing is the backbone of building any successful product. The young student community can start making changes to the testing model of Linux by start contributing during the college days to the industry standard project like Autotest.
There are various ways to this, one of the best possible way is to help student community to hack/develop some of the testing solutions. To kickstart this effort we are planning to conduct Autotest Hackfest. As we want to work on interesting area during the Hackspace we will be slecting some problems in Networking subsystem. So that at the end of the session we will be having code which will automate testing of packages related to Linux Networking subsystem.
In Autotest Hackfest we will help participants understand the tool and straight away start writting the code for testing some of the interesting packages in latest Fedora OS. Developed code will be mailed to the Autotest mailing list. Group of Linux testing professionals from IBM Linux Technology Centre will drive this hackspace and make this a successful event with challenging problems.
Open Source Robotics - Hacking a robot to be more social and educating

Open Source Robotics - Hacking a robot to be more social and educating

Speaker: Priya Kuber
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 3:00 pm
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Robotics
Type: Talk

Open source Robotics is a very diverse field. With applications in the field of automation, defense, health and games (Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-source_robotics). One of the use cases is explored in this talk, about the making of, and hacking on an interactive educational robot and increasing the learning possibilities in schools and as an educational toy-companion for kids.

To demonstrate I'll be hacking on the famous RoboBrrd (http://robotgrrl.com/robobrrd/) and enhancing more features and games to it to make it a more appealing tweakable educational toy or just an intelligent robot, companion for kids.

Minimum 3 additional interactive activities would be added to the existing RoboBrrd, simple hacks to make it more usable to kids and acting as an aid to teaching in the classroom with a visual output.


How people will benefit from attending it:

People will get an idea of an open source hardware project and how open source hardware hacking is done. Also, they would get acquitted with what the various step in building, alongwith the different technologies used. They would also learn the power of building in an open community and learn how well documented the projects are.


What your objective is:

My objective is to demonstrate the power of an Open source hardware community in building a better world of a more fun and interactive learning, using Arduino as a primary tool, as a technology tool for people to learn more about the world we live in. With a primary use case of an entertaining and educational typical classroom scenario.
 
3:15 pm  
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3:45 pm  
4:00 pm Freeing the Device Spectrum

Freeing the Device Spectrum

Speaker: Sebastian Kugler
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 4:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Development
Type: Talk

Freeing the Device Spectrum

Plasma Active is a Free software system built to support a spectrum of devices. It is based on a well-known and proven Free software stack, and aims at providing a user experience that aligns with how people integrate devices into their (digital) life, rather than providing just a way to run applications on, all based on an entirely Free software system, open and hackable.

Plasma Active provides more than just a launcher for applications. For users, it is a system that models around his or her digital life. The concept of Activities organises the users' digital assets in a way unseen on current devices. For developers, Plasma Active provides an answer how to get their software onto the users' devices on their own terms, not dictacted by large corporations. Most importantly, Plasma Active is a system open to anyone's imagination.

A bit more than one year ago, the KDE community incepted the Plasma Active project, a concerted and holistic effort to crack open the market for devices and provide a Free software system beyond the desktop. Much has happened in the first year, the team has released two stable versions of the system, partnering with the Mer project has lead to a good number of devices supported and even a tablet device preinstalled with Plasma Active becoming available to customers around the world.

In his talk, Sebastian addresses a general audience and outlines concepts and achievements Plasma Active, and an outlook to what can be expected. Demoes round up his introduction.
Hacking LibreOffice

Hacking LibreOffice

Speaker: Muthu Subramanian K
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 4:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Tutorial
Type: Tutorial

LibreOffice is the most powerful and viable Free Software office suite, available cross platform. This session would be a treat to would-be libreoffice hackers via a small hacking session.

In the last FOSS.in event. A talk with the same topic was provided. This time a tutorial for the same. The session would take simple tasks (mostly from the Calc or Impress Modules) and guide the audience to hack on it. This way the hackers would get a chance to hack LibreOffice and also more importantly be able to contribute as individuals and teams.
Building robots using open source hardware

Building robots using open source hardware

Speaker: Sudar Muthu
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 4:00 pm
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Robotics
Type: Workout

 
4:15 pm  
4:30 pm  
4:45 pm  
5:00 pm The CPU Hotplug infrastructure in Linux

The CPU Hotplug infrastructure in Linux

Speaker: Srivatsa S. Bhat
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 5:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Kernel Development
Type: Talk

  GlusterFS as a Storage Backend for oVirt/VDSM

GlusterFS as a Storage Backend for oVirt/VDSM

Speaker: Deepak C Shetty
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 5:00 pm
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: High Performance
Type: Talk

GlusterFS as a Storage Backend for oVirt/VDSM
===============================================
GlusterFS is a user-space distributed file system, capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over TCP/IP (and other supported transport layers) and interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware, for eg: x86-64 server(s).

http://www.gluster.org/

oVirt platform is a richly featured virtualization management solution providing fully integrated management across virtual machines. It aims to provides large scale, centralized management for server and desktop virtualization.

oVirt uses VDSM as the node virtualization management API. VDSM acts as the oVirt's host agent. VDSM abstracts low level details of the underlying linux hosts and exposes a high level API to oVirt for managing the linux host.

http://www.ovirt.org/

In recent times, there have been efforts to integrate Gluster as a block backend
to QEMU. There were patches posted in qemu-devel to support gluster as a block backend for qemu.

http://lists.nongnu.org/archive/html/qemu-devel/2012-06/msg01745.html

For QEMU-Gluster integration to be consumable from oVirt, we needed to make VDSM understand Gluster as a storage domain/backend.

This talk will focus on what it takes to integrate GlusterFS as a storage domain
in VDSM, different ways of doing it and how VDSM can be made to exploit the QEMU-Gluster block backend support.

Draft Flow of the presentation (Total time = 45min)
---------------------------------------------------

1) High level overview of oVirt/VDSM - 5min

2) VDSM Storage Concepts ( Domain, pool, SPM etc) - 5min

3) Different Approaches to integrating Gluster with VDSM as a Storage Domain

3a) Sharedfs/PosixFs approach - 10min

3b) Using VDSM Hooks - 10min

3c) More Native approaches ( under discussion with community as of now) - 10min

4) Q&A - 5min
   
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6:00 pm Hackernote: Day 1: How open source software has upended art

Hackernote: Day 1: How open source software has upended art

Speaker: Gene Kogan
Scheduled At: November 29, 2012, 6:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Hackernote
Type: Talk

The open source movement has challenged longstanding assumptions about
art practice. Communities of programmers and makers have collaborated
online to create mature software development kits such as Processing and
OpenFrameworks, as well as websites like Instructables.com where users
can document and share their process. The rapid digitization of the
blueprints for creative projects have greatly lowered the barrier to
getting started.

These new tools and practices have greatly influenced the workflows that
artists, designers, and technologists operate with, and have upended
traditional notions of authorship and copyright. Techniques manipulating
existing digital content have inspired much debate over legitimacy and
authenticity. This talk will critically examine this new outlook and
attempt to resolve some practical issues.

http://www.genekogan.com
http://www.twitter.com/genekogan
6:15 pm
6:30 pm
6:45 pm
7:00 pm          
7:15 pm          
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8:00 pm          
8:15 pm          

30th November 2012

Time Hall 1 [500] Hall 2 [220] Hall 3 [140] Tutorial Area 1 Tutorial Area 2
10:00 am Scalable Parallel Programming Techniques

Scalable Parallel Programming Techniques

Speaker: Ulrich Drepper
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 10:00 am
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: High Performance
Type: Talk

Metaprogramming and the Ruby Object model

Metaprogramming and the Ruby Object model

Speaker: Sidu Ponnappa
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 10:00 am
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Development Tools and Languages
Type: Talk

Ruby as a language is a fence sitter. It's mainstream enough that it can be safely lumped in with PHP, Python, Java, C# et al. It's also offers features that make it a more powerful language than these *but* lacks crucial features that the truly expressive languages have like homoiconicity, tail call optimisation and higher order functions.

If you don't understand these abilities of Ruby, you will fail to see it's value proposition.

Ruby has an elegant object model, a strong tool set for object oriented programming and offers many of the abilities of more powerful languages by simply exposing an API to its AST.

This talk will touch on Ruby's object model and the meta programming API and techniques that utilize Ruby's more advanced features to pull ahead of Java and friends. It will also cover the weaknesses that prevent it from achieving the expressiveness of, say, a Clojure and the inherent risks of trying to replace good design with metaprogramming.
Kernel Mini Conf

Kernel Mini Conf

Speaker: Poornima Nayak
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 10:00 am
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Mini Conf
Type: Mini Conf

Linux Kernel Mini Conf
Cloud Foundry

Cloud Foundry

Speaker: Cloud Foundry Community [Rajdeep]
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 10:00 am
Hall: Tutorial Area 1
Track: Cloud Computing
Type: Tutorial


Cloud Foundry Code Labs
Learn how to build Ruby on Rails apps and deploy to Cloud Foundry with a
hands of Session using tools like vmc.
Internet Governance

Internet Governance

Speaker: Centre for Internet & Society
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 10:00 am
Hall: Tutorial Area 2
Track: Mini Conf
Type: Mini Conf

10:15 am
10:30 am
10:45 am
11:00 am DNSSEC @ Mozilla

DNSSEC @ Mozilla

Speaker: Shyam Mani
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 11:00 am
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Sys Admin
Type: Talk

As the Internet world moves slowly towards implementing DNSSEC, this session aims to start at the basics of DNSSEC and goes on to discuss implementation details as well as best practices, some of the most common mistakes that happen during and after deployments and finally what¬タルs in store for the near future.

Basics
Will discuss the following topics :

Introduction to DNSSEC
Why DNSSEC is needed
New RR records ¬タモ DNSKEY, DS, NSEC and RRSIG
Keys
Relationship between the new RR records and keys aka Chain of Trust[demo]

Implementation

Things to consider before you implement
Setup at Mozilla, before and after
Commands
Config changes
Steps to switch
Verification [demo]
Possible issues to be aware of

Errors

Mistakes I made, Security Lameness and log levels

The Future

Where we stand with DNSSEC today
Possible issues that delay DNSSEC implementation
Data from Mozilla (before and after DNSSEC)
Possible changes to Firefox/Other Software
Sandboxing untrusted code in a Ruby App

Sandboxing untrusted code in a Ruby App

Speaker: Tejas Dinkar
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 11:00 am
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Development Tools and Languages
Type: Talk

Sometime you want to run untrusted code on your server. Our expirements with sandboxing started with the creation of a CI Service called Goldberg PRO, and then continued on with Ruby Monk [1], which needed to prevent users from performing potentially dangerous operations in code they submitted via the website.

Here we discuss various system level, language level, and application level techniques that we tried (and we plan to try in the future) to ensure that the user does not bring down the entire system. Some techniques we plan to speak about include LXC (Linux Containers), Chroots, Ruby's SAFE levels, Kernel level limitations, SELinux and PTrace.

Some of our learnings are published in the form of the Open Source ruby gem - secure [2]

[1] http://RubyMonk.com
[2] https://github.com/c42/secure
11:15 am
11:30 am
11:45 am
12:00 pm systemd as the Core OS

systemd as the Core OS

Speaker: Lennart Poettering
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 12:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Sys Admin
Type: Talk

systemd has grown from a mere init system into a basic set of components to build a Linux OS from. It is now used at the core of Fedora, OpenSUSE, Mageia, Tizen and will soon make its appearance in the various big enterprise Linuxes as well. It is also available in all important community distributions.

In this talk I'd like to explain where we are coming from, what we currently offer and where we want to go with systemd. I will give an overview of the various components, and our general approach to OS design. We will give a special focus on our quest to cover all three major bases of Linux: embedded/mobile, desktop and server and what we are doing to make systemd attractive to ehm.
Improve VLC or build applications on top of VLC

Improve VLC or build applications on top of VLC

Speaker: Jean-Baptiste Kempf
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 12:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Kernel Development
Type: Talk

12:15 pm
12:30 pm
12:45 pm
1:00 pm Lunch
1:15 pm
1:30 pm
1:45 pm
2:00 pm Delivering advanced input feature to users

Delivering advanced input feature to users

Speaker: Daiki Ueno
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Development
Type: Talk

Input method plays an essential role in internationalized desktop
particularly for CJK and Indic. However, sometimes it is not easy to
add advanced input features to input method, because it involves a
number of components as below:

- applications
- UI toolkits
- input method frameworks
- input method editors
- backend libraries

This talk will explain how they interact with each other, and discuss
how advanced input features such as re-conversion, prediction, online
word registration etc. could be delivered to users. Also we may
discuss about features rather related to UI, like character map or
handwriting, which require more thinking when it will be integrated
into desktop environments.

Benefit to attendees: They will learn the overview of the modern input
method architecture, and the way to create a feature-rich input method
editor and backend library in a reusable manner.
malloc, and what's inside it

malloc, and what's inside it

Speaker: Siddhesh Poyarekar
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Kernel Development
Type: Talk

The general idea of the internal implementation of dynamic memory allocation in GNU libc is known. However, there are a number of interesting implementation details that are not as widely known, while their impact is quite noticeable in a lot of cases.
Calligra - productivity made easier

Calligra - productivity made easier

Speaker: Shantanu Tushar
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Desktop
Type: Talk

Calligra is aimed to be an integrated productivity suite designed with the user in mind. Breaking apart from conventional flows, it provides an easy to use UI with all essential tools that are required for modern documents. It includes applications for word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, diagramming, database, painting, vector graphics and project scheduling. Calligra Words was awarded the Akademy award for best application at Akademy 2012 by KDE.

For contributors, its biggest strength comes from the fact that there is strong separation between the engine and UI. This allows creating different UIs for completely different situations. This has been proven where it just took few weeks for a student intern to develop a UI for tablet form factors. Further good news is that unlike other FOSS productivity programs, Calligra offers a clean and well maintained codebase. Additionally, it is powerful and cross platform, written using Qt and KDE frameworks.

This talk aims to introduce attendees to its features, and motivate contributors to join in realizing Calligra's full potential.

(Additional information on why Calligra is different: )
Hacking Apache CloudStack

Hacking Apache CloudStack

Speaker: CloudStack Community [Murali Reddy, Kishan Kavala, Rajesh Battala]
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Tutorial Area 1
Track: Cloud Computing
Type: Tutorial

Murali Reddy, Committer, Apache CloudStack

Kishan Kavala, Committer, Apache CloudStack

Rajesh Battala, Developer, Apache CloudStack

Apache CloudStack is an open source cloud platform that is currently
incubating as an Apache podling. The CloudStack platform is already in
use by cloud computing vendors and organizations looking to deploy cloud
computing environments in their own datacenters. This session starts
with an overview of CloudStack and it’s capabilities, followed by a
deep-dive into CloudStack architecture, and concludes with a hands-on
CloudStack hacking session.

CloudStack Architecture

During this session the committers at Apache CloudStack will walk you through the layering, subsystems and frameworks of CloudStack. Understand how CloudStack abstracts the complexity of dealing with heterogeneous hypervisors, how CloudStack storage subsystem works, or how networking services are provisioned in the world of virtualization and multi-tenant clouds. You will also get an overview of various integration points and on how to extend CloudStack platform with its plug-in capabilities.

CloudStack hacking with DevCloud:

In this part of the session, developers will get an opportunity to browse through CloudStack source code, build CloudStack and setup their own development environment using DevCloud. Come equipped with your laptop and the tools listed below, and enjoy hacking with fellow CloudStack developers.

DevCloud is a virtual appliance sandbox environment for developing on CloudStack. DevCloud runs on opensource VirtualBox and is based on Ubuntu 12.04, opensource xen server, a NFS server, MySQL server and comes with Java and other build tools preinstalled on it.

Prerequisites on your development laptop:

· Host OS: GNU/Linux 2.6+, Mac OSX 10.6+, Windows7 (Note: 64-bit Ubuntu 12.04+ or Mac OSX 1.7+ with XCode are recommended).
· Hardware: 2GiB RAM, x86_64 processor with Intel-VT or Amd-V, 8GiB of free disk space
Java IDE of your choice:
· Eclipse: Juno for Java Developers
· IntelliJ IDEA CE: 11.0

Tools (will also be provided, welcome to come pre-loaded):

· ant: 1.8.4 with jsch 0.1.48 or later
· maven: 3.0.4 (pre-populated ~/.m2/repository will be provided)
· mkisofs: 3.00
· java/jdk: 1.6

Note: Every attendee will receive a USB stick with pre-populated tools and software.
Firefox OS

Firefox OS

Speaker: Ben Kero
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Tutorial Area 2
Track: Mobile Development
Type: Demonstration

Demonstration of Firefox OS
2:15 pm
2:30 pm
2:45 pm  
3:00 pm Creating Data as a Service & Search on Windows Azure with MYSQL, couchDB, Apache Solr

Creating Data as a Service & Search on Windows Azure with MYSQL, couchDB, Apache Solr

Speaker: Saranya Sriram
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 3:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Cloud Computing
Type: Talk

Windows Azure provides very compelling data services over MySQL, couchDB, MongoDB and Apache Solr to provide true data-as-a-service solutions that enable developers and customers to build applications at scale without the worry of provisioning and maintaining their databases. Join this session to see us build a mash up app that uses Solr for indexing and search with data sourced from multiple 3rd party data services.
Extending GlusterFS - the translator way

Extending GlusterFS - the translator way

Speaker: Vijay Bellur
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 3:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: High Performance
Type: Talk

GlusterFS is a stackable distributed scale-out file system in user space. At the core of GlusterFS are building blocks known as translators. Each translator is a self-contained functional unit and various translators can be stacked together to build a file system that serves a workload. With addition of new translators, the capabilities of GlusterFS can be extended.

This talk will discuss how a new translator can be built from the ground up. The talk will cover infrastructure components that are useful in building a new translator and how the newly built translator can be integrated into GlusterFS's management stack. The talk will also demo extending GlusterFS functionality by building a new translator.
KDE Mini Conf

KDE Mini Conf

Speaker: Shantanu Tushar
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 3:00 pm
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Mini Conf
Type: Mini Conf

The KDE Miniconf will be targeted at showcasing the new technologies and experiences we have built in the recent years. Additionally we will have talks for people who are new to KDE and wish to contribute. Target audience is anyone who would like to contribute to KDE - be it desktop applications, work on our core framework, tablet UX and so on. There are no specific pre-requisites for this.
 
3:15 pm  
3:30 pm  
3:45 pm  
4:00 pm GNOME 3.6 - Design decisions, Main Changes, Future Visions

GNOME 3.6 - Design decisions, Main Changes, Future Visions

Speaker: Tobias Mueller
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 4:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Development
Type: Talk

With the GNOME 3.6 release on September 26th 2012 many visible improvements were delivered to users around the world. While many people already excitedly use GNOME 3, Linux distributions have just started to provide the brand new user experience to their users. Hence, the new and elegant desktop with features like distraction-free notifications or redesigned system settings is not yet wildly known.

The talk will introduce to some of the design philosophies inherent in GNOME 3 as well as the main changes brought to users and developers. Attendees are required to know what a Desktop is and should ideally have experienced the brand new GNOME 3 desktop to be able to ask tough questions.
OpenShift Origin : Open PaaS Done Right

OpenShift Origin : Open PaaS Done Right

Speaker: Shekhar Gulati
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 4:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Cloud Computing
Type: Talk

OpenShift Origin is the open source project by RedHat to create the best platform as a Service solution for enterprises. This session will talk about :
- Why open source matters in building PaaS
- What is OpenShift Origin and its architecture
- How can you build a multi-node PaaS on your infrastructure
- Demo application running on local OpenShift instance
- Comparison with other open paas solutions
 
4:15 pm  
4:30 pm  
4:45 pm  
5:00 pm expEYES, a portable science laboratory

expEYES, a portable science laboratory

Speaker: Ajith Kumar
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 5:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Development
Type: Talk

expEYES (experiments for young enginers and scientists) is a piece of hardware that converts a PC into a science laboratory. The objective of the project is to provide a low cost but advanced tool for students to learn science by exploring and experimenting.
It contains a micro-controller that communicates to the PC using a Python library. Real time measurement/control are done as per commands from the PC and data is send back for analysis and plotting. It functions as a voltmeter, frequency counter and low frequency CRO.Totally developed using Free Software tools and distributed under GPL. Hardware is design is open with permission for royalty-free production. Details are at expeyes.in. Like to present the new version called expEYES Junior.
FOSS on Aakash

FOSS on Aakash

Speaker: Srikant Patnaik
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 5:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Mobile Development
Type: Talk

GlusterFS block backend for QEMU

GlusterFS block backend for QEMU

Speaker: M. Mohan Kumar
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 5:00 pm
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: High Performance
Type: Talk

GlusterFS is a user space distributed filesystem capable of aggregating
various storage servers into one and present it as a large storage pool to
the clients. It is a meta filesystem, hence it needs an underlying filesystem
to export (similar to NFS). As of now GlusterFS does not have any support
to export block devices to the client.

GlusterFS can be a good backend for storing KVM disk images. Efforts are
currently going on to make QEMU - GlusterFS communication more efficient by
removing overheads like FUSE layer in between.

VM images can be served to QEMU either as a file or as a block device. Using
block devices to serve VM images gives performance improvements, since it
avoids some file system bottlenecks in the host kernel. However, using block
devices to store VM images has it's own challenges, like needing one block
device per VM and/or requireing a SAN controller to servce block devices.

We are adding GlusterFS feature to export block devices as regular files
to the client for following reasons:
* VM images appear as files, thus allowing simple filesystem commands like
tar and cp to manipulate the images and in turn the logical volumes.
* It becomes easlier to support features like snapshots and linked clones
with logical volumes (block devices).

In this presentation we will talk about the design of Block Device
translator for GlusterFS, challenges faced in this approach, current
progress of development and future work required.
   
5:15 pm    
5:30 pm    
5:45 pm    
6:00 pm Hackernote: Why knowing your hardware is important

Hackernote: Why knowing your hardware is important

Speaker: Ulrich Drepper
Scheduled At: November 30, 2012, 6:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Hackernote
Type: Talk

6:15 pm
6:30 pm
6:45 pm
7:00 pm          
7:15 pm          
7:30 pm          
7:45 pm          
8:00 pm          
8:15 pm          

1st December 2012

Time Hall 1 [500] Hall 2 [220] Hall 3 [140] Tutorial Area 1 Tutorial Area 2
10:00 am So you want to be an Audio Plumber

So you want to be an Audio Plumber

Speaker: Arun Raghavan
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 10:00 am
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Desktop
Type: Talk

This is going to partly be a crash course in Linux audio plumbing.
I'll be talking about what the pieces of the audio stack are, what
challenges we face, what we've been doing recently, and where there is
room for contribution.

More importantly, though, I'll be talking about what makes it all so
much fun! Anybody who is interested in mucking around in the lower
layers of the stack has all the prerequisites needed already.
  The Battle of the Open Source Clouds - OpenStack vs. CloudStack vs. Eucalyptus

The Battle of the Open Source Clouds - OpenStack vs. CloudStack vs. Eucalyptus

Speaker: Janakiram MSV
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 10:00 am
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Mini Conf
Type: Mini Conf

Creating Art with Code Tutorial

Creating Art with Code Tutorial

Speaker: Gene Kogan
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 10:00 am
Hall: Tutorial Area 1
Type: Tutorial

 
10:15 am    
10:30 am   Field Data/Big Data

Field Data/Big Data

Speaker: Gora Mohanty
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 10:30 am
Hall: Tutorial Area 2
Track: Mini Conf
Type: Mini Conf

10:45 am  
11:00 am Triaging Bug Reports in GNOME

Triaging Bug Reports in GNOME

Speaker: Tobias Mueller
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 11:00 am
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Type: Tutorial

KGDB: Kernel Source Level Debugger

KGDB: Kernel Source Level Debugger

Speaker: Swapnil Pimpale
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 11:00 am
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Development Tools and Languages
Type: Talk

KGDB is a source level debugger for Linux kernel. It is used along with GDB to debug Linux kernel. Kernel developers can debug a kernel similar to application programs with the use of KGDB. It makes it possible to place breakpoints in kernel code, step through the code, observe variables, inspect memory and look through call stack information.

Two machines are required for using KGDB. One of these machines is a development machine and the other is a test machine. The machines are connected through a serial line (a null-modem cable) which connects their serial ports. The kernel to be debugged runs on the test machine. GDB runs on the development machine. The serial line is used by GDB to communicate to the kernel being debugged. Latest KGDB versions also have the support for Ethernet as a medium for connecting development and test machines. Its possible to debug a guest machine kernel as well, through a pseudo serial line.

The GDB feature of thread analysis can be used with KGDB to look into kernel threads. KGDB can also be used for debugging kernel modules.

The presentation will consist of the following:
- Need for kernel debugging techniques
- Basic Debugging
- KGDB internals ¬タモ Setup, Usage, Working, Limitations
- Questions and Answers

How will people benefit from attending it?
Bugs in kernel code frequently result in a lockup or a reboot. Hence, kernel developers and hackers are always in need of reliable debugging mechanism for identifying bugs in the kernel code. Attending this session will help developers understand KGDB internals and how it can be helpful in identifying problematic code.

My Objective for presentation:
Objective of this talk is to cover KGDB internals and demonstrate how KGDB finds its usage in debugging kernel code.
Cloud Mini Conf

Cloud Mini Conf

Speaker: CloudFoundry Community
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 11:00 am
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Mini Conf
Type: Mini Conf

LTP Hackspace Session

LTP Hackspace Session

Speaker: Shubham Goyal
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 11:00 am
Hall: Tutorial Area 1
Track: Kernel Development
Type: Workout

Refer this page to know more about LTP - ltp.sourceforge.net
11:15 am
11:30 am  
11:45 am  
12:00 pm GStreamer 1.0: Faster, easier, just better!

GStreamer 1.0: Faster, easier, just better!

Speaker: Olivier Crête
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 12:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Desktop
Type: Talk

Evaluation of the KVM assurance of security

Evaluation of the KVM assurance of security

Speaker: Onkar N Mahajan
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 12:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Development
Type: Talk

The KVM Hypervisor continues to grow as a viable, valuable and cost effective virtualization solution. In this presentation, we evaluate the KVM Hypervisor assurance of security on the basis of few basic benchmarks necessary to realize secure hypervisor. This analysis improves our understanding of the current state of security, outstanding issues, and future directions towards building KVM Hypervisor as trusted virtualization platform.
   
12:15 pm    
12:30 pm    
12:45 pm    
1:00 pm Lunch
1:15 pm
1:30 pm
1:45 pm
2:00 pm Managing Gluster from oVirt

Managing Gluster from oVirt

Speaker: Shireesh Anjal
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: High Performance
Type: Talk

The oVirt Project is an open virtualization project for anyone who cares about Linux-based KVM virtualization. Providing a feature-rich server virtualization management system with advanced capabilities for hosts and guests, including high availability, live migration, storage management, system scheduler, and more.

GlusterFS is an open source, distributed file system capable of scaling to several petabytes (actually, 72 brontobytes!) and handling thousands of clients.

This talk will cover the architecture of oVirt and details of recent enhancements supporting
- Creation and management of Gluster Storage Clusters in oVirt (GUI + REST api)
- Using gluster as underlying storage layer for VM images
Opportunities to Make Tux Dance

Opportunities to Make Tux Dance

Speaker: Poornima Nayak
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Testing
Type: Talk

Linux, being the poster child of open source development involves very complex pieces of heterogeneous modules with hundreds of thousands of lines of code developed by hundreds of developers across the globe. Being an Open Source project Linux does not have much of luxury of being tested like other OS which gets developed by one organization. There is gap in pace of Linux OS features development to testing. Off late Linux is getting used by the students in colleges itself due its availability and ease of use. So there is very good opportunity for the students community to get involved into development and testing of Linux OS in very much earlier stage of their career. We thought we should communicate this to students how they can contribute to Industry standard projects while they are studying.
In this talk we will talk about how Linux is being tested by various organizations like IBM, Novell, Intel and various other giants. We will talk more about various areas in which IBM is contributing. In IBM we have been using as well as contributing for various test Automation tools & Test management tools like LTP, LDTP, Autotest & Testopia. There are lots of challenging and interesting things to do with respect to Linux OS testing & test development. This talk will focus little bit in depth on some of the test tools and how students can contribute in these projects. Contributions to these projects will help them to create identity for themselves in IT community before they come out of their institutions. Getting involved in testing initiatives will help them to enhance OS knowledge as well as knowledge of tools involved in testing.
Though most of this talk seem to be targeted for students, this talk will help to open up channel for collaboration of test engineers working in various organization in Linux domain.
Cloud Mini Conf

Cloud Mini Conf

Speaker: CloudStack Community
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Hall 3 [140]
Track: Mini Conf
Type: Mini Conf

Debian Tutorial

Debian Tutorial

Speaker: Kartik Mistry,Praveen A., Vasudev Kamath
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 2:00 pm
Hall: Tutorial Area 1
Type: Tutorial

 
2:15 pm  
2:30 pm  
2:45 pm  
3:00 pm Document your code

Document your code

Speaker: Kushal Das
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 3:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Development Tools and Languages
Type: Talk

Writing documentation can lead to better code.

We will start from why and will go into details of how to document python codebases.
topics in the talk

What to write
reStructuredText
Sphinx
http://readthedocs.org

People will get the understanding and technical details of writing documentation for the code they write. This will help to become better developer in general.
Thinking in C/C++, coding in Java

Thinking in C/C++, coding in Java

Speaker: Arvind Jayaprakash
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 3:00 pm
Hall: Hall 2 [220]
Track: Development
Type: Talk

Intent: There comes a time in every C/C++ programmer's life where he is looking at a smashed stack, a trashed heap & wishes that core dumps happened only when null pointers get deferenced. This is the weak moment when people hang up their gdb boots & trade it for java.lang.NullPointerException We shall be exploring how to use Java as a safer version of C without giving up too much of control. A lot of big open source projects are starting to show up in Java for this very reason (eg: hadoop)

Overview: The Java programming language was considered too slow and too high level in its early days by performance junkies who believed that the only true way out was to code in C (and very reluctantly in C++). The language itself made significant strides by the time it reached v5 and JVMs also have become quite good at what they do. We shall explore 3 kinds of topics
* Areas where parity has been achieved
* Areas where the java language design will always make it trail behind
* Areas where where java offers "performance enhancing drugs" that cannot be done in a reasonable way using C
   
3:15 pm    
3:30 pm    
3:45 pm    
4:00 pm        
4:15 pm          
4:30 pm Panel Discussion

Panel Discussion

Speaker: Lennart Poettering
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 4:30 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Panel Discussion

4:45 pm
5:00 pm
5:15 pm
5:30 pm Hackernote: Day 3: "Mind Hacks"

Hackernote: Day 3: "Mind Hacks"

Speaker: Team foss.in
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 5:30 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Hackernote
Type: Talk

5:45 pm
6:00 pm
6:15 pm
6:30 pm Closing Ceremony

Closing Ceremony

Speaker: Team foss.in
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 6:30 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Special Event
Type: Special

6:45 pm
7:00 pm Entertainment: Team FOSS.in

Entertainment: Team FOSS.in

Speaker: Team FOSS.in
Scheduled At: December 1, 2012, 7:00 pm
Hall: Hall 1 [500]
Track: Entertainment
Type: Entertainment

7:15 pm
7:30 pm
7:45 pm
8:00 pm
8:15 pm

Legend

 Development Mini Conf Panel Discussion Cloud Computing
 Tutorial Mobile Development Hackernote Special Event
 Kernel Development Development Tools and Languages High Performance Break
 Entertainment Robotics Operating Systems Sys Admin
 Web Development Desktop Testing Open Standards